Category Archives: HST 122

Why did we choose to industrialize?

This Saturday, I had the great pleasure of participating in a book roundtable on Robert Sweeny’s Why Did We Choose to Industrialize? at the Social Science History Association conference in Chicago. Robert is an incredibly engaged and engaging scholar. We (Martin … Continue reading

Posted in HST 122, Nineteenth Century, Reflection | Tagged , | Leave a comment

A History of the World in Maps

Shocking really, what you can find on the Internet. I found this incredible video on one of the blogs that I follow. It charts world civilization, displaying political entities year-by-year. Utterly fascinating. (BTW, it displays much better on a laptop … Continue reading

Posted in Digital History, HST 121, HST 122, HST197, Teaching, Uncategorized | Tagged , | Leave a comment

New Books

This weekend, the Wall Street Journal reviewed two new books on evergreen topics that are sure to be of interest to students. The first is a biography of the Duke of Monmouth, the bastard son of Charles II who put … Continue reading

Posted in Georgian England, HST 122, Reviews, Stuart England, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

In defense of the college lecture

Finally! I decided to become an academic historian because of a brilliant lecturer and Bede scholar, Roger Ray. My whole career, I have attempted to emulate Roger and taken every opportunity to improve content, delivery, engagement, etc. I wrote about … Continue reading

Posted in HST 121, HST 122, Reflection | Leave a comment

Our deadly species

While on vacation, I saw links to two article detailing our wonderful propensity to kill each other. Here in tabular form the deadliest conflicts in human history. http://ai.mee.nu/historys_bloodiest_wars_and_who_to_blame If cutsie Millennial websites are your thing, perhaps this article from American … Continue reading

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Stab-in-the-Back manuscript to publisher!

This evening I sent the text of The Stab-in-the-Back Myth. A History in Documents and Visual Sources off to Bloomsbury Press. In cooperation with Mark Sadler (my friend and former Honors student), I have been working diligently on it for the … Continue reading

Posted in Germany, Great War, HST 122, Nazi Germany, Research, World War 1 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Weihnachtsgeschenke

I love Amazon for Christmas! Meine Gattin bought me two doorstops: Alan Watson, Ring of Steel and Stephen Kotkin, Stalin, Paradoxes of Power. I have already dipped into a library copy of Watson and almost wish that I hadn’t. Prepping … Continue reading

Posted in Austria, Germany, Great War, HST 122, Russia | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment