Category Archives: HST 122

Why did we choose to industrialize?

This Saturday, I had the great pleasure of participating in a book roundtable on Robert Sweeny’s Why Did We Choose to Industrialize? at the Social Science History Association conference in Chicago. Robert is an incredibly engaged and engaging scholar. We (Martin … Continue reading

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A History of the World in Maps

Shocking really, what you can find on the Internet. I found this incredible video on one of the blogs that I follow. It charts world civilization, displaying political entities year-by-year. Utterly fascinating. (BTW, it displays much better on a laptop … Continue reading

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New Books

This weekend, the Wall Street Journal reviewed two new books on evergreen topics that are sure to be of interest to students. The first is a biography of the Duke of Monmouth, the bastard son of Charles II who put … Continue reading

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In defense of the college lecture

Finally! I decided to become an academic historian because of a brilliant lecturer and Bede scholar, Roger Ray. My whole career, I have attempted to emulate Roger and taken every opportunity to improve content, delivery, engagement, etc. I wrote about … Continue reading

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Our deadly species

While on vacation, I saw links to two article detailing our wonderful propensity to kill each other. Here in tabular form the deadliest conflicts in human history. http://ai.mee.nu/historys_bloodiest_wars_and_who_to_blame If cutsie Millennial websites are your thing, perhaps this article from American … Continue reading

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Stab-in-the-Back manuscript to publisher!

This evening I sent the text of The Stab-in-the-Back Myth. A History in Documents and Visual Sources off to Bloomsbury Press. In cooperation with Mark Sadler (my friend and former Honors student), I have been working diligently on it for the … Continue reading

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Weihnachtsgeschenke

I love Amazon for Christmas! Meine Gattin bought me two doorstops: Alan Watson, Ring of Steel and Stephen Kotkin, Stalin, Paradoxes of Power. I have already dipped into a library copy of Watson and almost wish that I hadn’t. Prepping … Continue reading

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“The Power of Peace: New Perspectives on the Congress of Vienna (1814-1815)”

https://twitter.com/DavidRArmitage/status/457119165527375872 I posted on this conference earlier and expressed the wish to go. Check out the podcasts – they are worth your time. I have found plenty of material to integrate into my Congress of Vienna module.

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Two new mapping resources

MT @natlibscot: Free online maps show how Victorian towns & cities developed http://t.co/nGYstJWlmX pic.twitter.com/oss0LDzJIC — Steven Gray (@Sjgray86) March 21, 2014 Take a virtual stroll around Georgian London in these incredible 1830's London Street Views. http://t.co/xNj8ztLLUo — Keir Clarke (@KeirClarke) … Continue reading

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Timeline of the French Revolution

A week too late for this year’s lecture, an Interactive timeline of the French Revolution. I will embed it into my PowerPoint and use it next year for my online course.  

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Literary Atlas of Europe

You owe it to yourself to click on the link. The is a most amazing project to map European culture put together by a Swiss-German-Czech team of researchers. #dha2014 Literary Atlas of Europe: http://t.co/uSbO8qhddA V. cool speculative project suit. — … Continue reading

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Memorial bricks

One of the items of memory that has really impressed me on my last several trips to Berlin is the laying of “memory bricks” – Stolpersteine – outside of the houses where German Jews had lived prior to their deportation … Continue reading

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Scotland, the Stuarts, and the Glorious Revolution

If the period interests you, follow the link contained in this Tweet. Its worth it if only for the terrific battle scene in the header of the Bonnie Dundee blog. On this day 1689, Dundee withdraws from the Convention of … Continue reading

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Everbody’s got a hero …

Juraj Janosik, the Slovakian Robin Hood, was hanged #onthisday 17 Mar 1713 http://t.co/vecupmI1vl #literature #twitterstorians — executedtoday (@executedtoday) March 17, 2014

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Map of Europe 1000 to the present

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=14d_1348362692 Give this link a try.

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Timothy Snyder on events in Ukraine

This Tweet from Anne Applebaum Some in the West spread Russian propaganda out of ignorance, some for money, writes Tim Snyder @nybooks http://t.co/SYC9assw9M — Anne Applebaum (@anneapplebaum) March 12, 2014 put me on to three articles by Timothy Snyder in New … Continue reading

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Interactive Map of Early Modern London

This just posted: an interactive map of Early Modern London. I love the interactive Map of Early Modern London w/ Stow notations more than is probably healthy http://t.co/gAEWuTUiGK — Nancy Bilyeau (@Tudorscribe) March 11, 2014 I have been playing around … Continue reading

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The Congress of Vienna

  Harvard University will be hosting an international conference – The Power of Peace: New Perspectives on the Congress of Vienna (1814-1815) –  April 11, 2014.  The prospectus  tells it all: “2014-15 will mark the bicentenary of the Congress of … Continue reading

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On the day in history …

61 years ago today, one of the most evil men in human history died. Joseph Stalin died on this day in 1953 http://t.co/Spzwjtksk1 pic.twitter.com/U1lhaomflY — History Today (@HistoryToday) March 5, 2014 Had he died 25 years earlier, tens of millions … Continue reading

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Napoleon’s last exile

I hate it when I have to stop telling a good story. See this: Terrible Exile: The Last Days of Napoleon on St Helena Brian Unwin – I. B. Tauris. http://t.co/pYd564EBQl — New History Books (@history_book) February 27, 2014 One reviewer … Continue reading

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