Category Archives: Resources

The Magna Carta at the British Library

As you would expect, the British Library has a major exhibit bringing together extant copies of the Great Charter. Also announced today, the cover of our #MagnaCarta exhibition book @britishlibrary @BLMedieval http://t.co/1aqwlokHsJ pic.twitter.com/2XGIaKpOQG — Julian Harrison (@julianpharrison) February 2, 2015 … Continue reading

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Magna Carta

I follow Tom Holland – one of my favorite historians – on Twitter. He always has something interesting to say. In the tweet below, he brought my attention to an essay by David Carpenter in The Guardian: "What happened in a … Continue reading

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Maps and Historians

Geographers, cartologists, and historians have a lot to say to each other. (Most of it good!) Why Historical #Maps Still Matter So Much, Even Today http://t.co/8K6oij5d2P #hgis #history — HGIS Lab USASK (@HGIS_UofSK) January 3, 2015 This linked article from … Continue reading

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Scotland, the Stuarts, and the Glorious Revolution

If the period interests you, follow the link contained in this Tweet. Its worth it if only for the terrific battle scene in the header of the Bonnie Dundee blog. On this day 1689, Dundee withdraws from the Convention of … Continue reading

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Interactive Map of Early Modern London

This just posted: an interactive map of Early Modern London. I love the interactive Map of Early Modern London w/ Stow notations more than is probably healthy http://t.co/gAEWuTUiGK — Nancy Bilyeau (@Tudorscribe) March 11, 2014 I have been playing around … Continue reading

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New British Library music blog

OK, so you already know that I am a big fan of the British Library manuscript blog. Here’s a new one: New Music blog: Female pipings in Eden: Ethel Smyth's fight for women's rights. http://t.co/Kc7uVkCM7w #IWD2014 — The British Library … Continue reading

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A new British Library manuscript

Here is lovely picture is the Roman Emperor Vespasian suffering from leprosy. So, is this a medieval medical text? Here's an image from the medieval manuscript just acquired by @britishlibrary @BLMedieval http://t.co/sYQvCPBMKK pic.twitter.com/OCapPUyRWz — Julian Harrison (@julianpharrison) March 6, 2014 Follow … Continue reading

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Planting season!

Now that March is here, its time to get out in the fields! A calendar page for March; tilling the soil, 15th-century style. http://t.co/kri0akrIPM pic.twitter.com/hFb31B1a4G — The British Library (@britishlibrary) March 4, 2014

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British Library debate on the First World War, 2/24/2014

On February 24, the British Library kicked off the centenary of the beginning of the Great War by sponsoring a debate. Participating were Gary Sheffield, Annika Mombauer, Dan Todman, and Neil Faulkner . "The First World War: The Debate" video now online at http://t.co/xmssUpjPZu /via … Continue reading

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Happy Birthday Charles V!

Holy Roman Emperor, Charles V was born on this day (February 24) in 1500. Charles was the preeminent ruler in Europe, with influence extending far beyond the Empire. Hey, he owned the Western Hemisphere (minus Brazil). Holy Roman Emperor Charles … Continue reading

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Check out this 8th century manuscript!

Sometimes I feel that I do nothing on this blog but shill for the British Library. Perhaps they should pay me! If you are interested in the Middle Ages at all, I really suggest that you open the link embedded … Continue reading

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Anne Boleyn’s Book of Hours

BBC Channel 5 is running a series, Henry and Anne: The Lovers Who Changed History. In the first episode, Henry and Anne (then a lady-in-waiting to Queen Catherine) wrote flirtatious messages to each other in Anne’s Book of Days. You can … Continue reading

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Martin Luther’s Gotha Testament of 1537 now digitized online

One of the most important sites of research into the history of the Reformation is the weblog “Study Center for Protestantism” in at the University of Erfurt. Over the next few years, sponsored by a grant from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft … Continue reading

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Digitizing Jane Austen

The British Arts and Humanities Research Council is promoting a project at Oxford University to digitize the written manuscripts of Jane Austen. This from the web press release: “Few scholars have examined these manuscripts in close detail, and now anyone … Continue reading

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Roman Coins Online!

In my online HST121, I have students visit a numismatic website featuring Roman coins and ask them to write a brief comment on what we can learn from coins. As I learned today via Twitter: online coins of the roman … Continue reading

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The Loeb Classical Library now available online!

One of the pleasures of my undergraduate years was going to the library and pulling classical texts in the  Loeb Classical Library off the shelf. Well, the red volumes anyway. Loeb editions of Latin authors had red covers, those of … Continue reading

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Saints’ Lives … and Deaths

Having grown up surrounded by wall calendars with the Feast Days of the Saints printed in red, I am eagerly awaiting a new series from the British Library medieval manuscripts blog. A beginner's guide to medieval saints with some cute … Continue reading

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Walking Hadrian’s Wall with Google Street View

Dr. Christoph Pallaske of the Historisches Institut at the Universität zu Köln has developed the most interesting site (segu or selbstgesteuert entwickelnder geschichts-unterricht) that allows users to visit historical places using Google Street View. One very interesting example is this walk along … Continue reading

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New British Library exhibition on Georgian England

The British Library has opened a new exhibit on Georgian England to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the accession of George I to the British throne. Here’s what we had to say about the @britishlibrary exhibition Georgians Revealed http://t.co/CKkHnex32c — … Continue reading

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Voltaire and the Republic of Letters

Voltaire was part of an international network of intellectuals dedicated to the principles of the Enlightenment who maintained contact with each other via correspondence. The Digital Humanities Center at Stanford University, with generous support from the Office of Digital Humanities … Continue reading

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